Loch Nis – The lake and the Monster “Nessie” in Loch Ness

Loch Nis – The lake and the Monster “Nessie” in Loch Ness

A large, deep, freshwater loch in the Scottish Highlands extending for approximately 37 kilometres southwest of Inverness. Its surface is 16 metres above sea level. It is one of a series of interconnected, murky bodies of water in Scotland its water visibility is exceptionally low due to a high peat content in the surrounding soil.

Loch Ness, reported home of the monster / Image: memolands.com

Loch Ness is best known for alleged sightings of the cryptozoological Loch Ness Monster. The earliest report of a monster in the vicinity of Loch Ness appears in the Life of St. Columba by Adomnán, written in the sixth century AD. According to Adomnán, writing about a century after the events described, Irish monk Saint Columba was staying in the land of the Picts with his companions when he encountered local residents burying a man by the River Ness. They explained that the man was swimming in the river when he was attacked by a “water beast” that mauled him and dragged him underwater.

Columba sent a follower, Luigne moccu Min, to swim across the river. The beast approached him, but Columba made the sign of the cross and said: “Go no further. Do not touch the man. Go back at once.” The creature stopped as if it had been “pulled back with ropes” and fled, and Columba’s men and the Picts gave thanks for what they perceived as a miracle.

Its deepest point is 230 meters making it the second deepest loch in Scotland after Loch Morar / Image: memolands.com

The first modern discussion of a sighting of a strange creature in the loch may have been in the 1870s, when D. Mackenzie of Balnain claimed to have seen something “wriggling and churning up the water”. This account was not published until 1934, however. Research indicates that several newspapers did publish items about a creature (large “beast” or “whale-like fish” ) in the loch well before 1934.

Over the years various hoaxes were also perpetrated, usually “proven” by photographs that were later debunked.

A view of the “Loch Ness Monster,” near Inverness, Scotland, April 19, 1934. The photograph, one of two pictures known as the ‘surgeon’s photographs,’ was allegedly taken by Colonel Robert Kenneth Wilson, though it was later exposed as a hoax by Chris Spurling, who, on his deathbed, revealed that the pictures were staged by himself, Marmaduke and Ian Wetherell, and Wilson. More than 1,000 people claim to have seen ‘Nessie’ and the area is, consequently, a popular tourist attraction / Image: by Keystone/Getty Images

Featured Image: Loch Ness / Image: memolands.com

Websites: visitscotland.com



 

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