The No. 2857 bus – The vehicle of victory is being exhibited in Dearborn

On December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, Rosa Louise McCauley Parks, an American activist, rejected bus driver James F. Blake’s order to vacate a row of four seats in the “colored” section in favor of a white passenger, once the “white” section was filled.

The No. 2857 bus at the Henry Ford Museum / Image source

Parks was not the first person to resist bus segregation, but the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People believed that she was the best candidate for seeing through a court challenge after her arrest for civil disobedience in violating Alabama segregation laws, and she helped inspire the black community to boycott the Montgomery buses for over a year.

Rosa Parks was sitting in the 2nd row from the front, all the way to the right window / Image source
Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (1913 – 2005) was an American activist in the civil rights movement best known for her pivotal role in the Montgomery bus boycott.

Parks’ act of defiance and the Montgomery bus boycott became important symbols of the movement. She became an international icon of resistance to racial segregation, and organized and collaborated with civil rights leaders, including Edgar Nixon and Martin Luther King Jr.

The No. 2857 bus on which Rosa Parks was riding before her arrest, is now a museum exhibit at the Henry Ford Museum.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Contact Us